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Showing posts from July 22, 2007

When Art Commissions Go Bad: Michael Golden

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The image you're looking at cost art collector Gerry Turnbull $537 and several months of his life to get. Like most people Gerry has always had admiration for Michael Golden's work. It's hard not to admire Golden's work, personally I love it. In my own opinion he's an incredibly talented artist. I grew up reading his Batman stories and thinking that they were the best things ever. His use of colour to compliment his art is nothing short of amazing to my eyes. One thing I have been aware of over the years is that he doesn't meet deadlines easily and that's always been the excuse as to why he's not done more work in the comic book field. He makes a decent living via advertising work, comic books are a sideline. However when all is said and done Michael Golden is one of the masters of the comic book industry, talent to burn and indeed talent oozes from his artistic pores. Golden is also the subject of a recent 'book' about him, published by TwoMor…

Monty Wedd & Stanley Pitt

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Just sharing some recent finds. I'm not exactly sure how common these two covers are, possibly someone with a bit more knowledge than I, say Kevin Patrick, might be able to look at them and pin-point them exactly down to the day they came out. I bought them recently just for the covers - they're flimsy little books, all text, and the T.D. Rand book has a brilliant title - War On Fences. I've not read the book so I'm not sure if the cowboys in question are actually fighting fences, or if they conduct war whilst sitting on fences. I have no idea how many of these little books were produced, nor how many covers either Wedd or Pitt drew. I suspect that the answer might well be quite a few as these artists would have been able to produce these images at a fairly rapid pace, and the pay wouldn't have been too bad.

The Border Rustlers. Cover art by Monty Wedd. Published by The Whitman Press, 21 Macquarie Place, Sydney. Wedd is an Australian artist, best known for hi…

The Destruction of Ross Andru & Mike Esposito's Zen The Intergalactic Ninja Original Art

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What you're looking at is one of the few remaining pages drawn by Ross Andru and Mike Esposito for the Zen, The Intergalactic Ninja series. The book wasn't their best effort, but it did mark the last time that the celebrated duo would see print in a comic book, sadly Ross Andru passed away soon after the book was published, thus while Zen might not have been the most loved, or known, strip of all the Andru & Esposito work, it holds a special place as being their last collaborative effort. That counts for something. The pair did two issues of the book, plus a pin-up that doubled as a cover. Nothing to sneeze at.

So why is there so little art out there? Generally the answer is because the art is hoarded by collectors or dealers. People generally don't want to part with things because it either holds a special place in their hearts, or they're speculating and are just holding on hoping that their purchases will increase in value and make them richer than they alre…

More Original Art Stories: Detective Comics #627

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This one wasn't from the on-line pen of the Former DC Staffer, rather it's a little mystery that I uncovered all on my own.

The painting you're looking at is the original painting, painted by Norm Breyfogle, that ended up as the cover for the landmark issue of Detective Comics #627. It was a landmark in that it celebrated the 600th appearance of Batman in that title. The idea at the time, as hatched by editor Denny O'Neil, was to update both the cover and the first ever Batman story. This idea wasn't a new one as Julius Schwartz had already done just that in 1969 when the 30th Anniversary of Batman had come round. The first story was written by Bill Finger and drawn by Bob Kane (or at least that's what we're led to believe, although the consensus is that Kane probably did indeed draw this one on his own). In 1969 Mike Friedrich, Bob Brown and Joe Giella took a pass at it, and for this issue the then creative teams of Batman's Marv Wolfman, Jim Aparo and